SeaSpan Newsletter

SeaSpan Newsletter

October 2006
SeaSpan–Marine Conservation News from the Pew Institute for Ocean
Science
October – A  2006, volume 12-17
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CONTENTS:

*SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENT: Pew Institute Seeks Director for Operations and
Strategic Planning Development

A) FEATURE

1) U.N. to Consider Deep Sea Trawling Ban

B) NEWS AND VIEWS

2) U.S. President Bush Calls for Halt of Bottom Trawling
3) Popular Soup Imperils Sharks
4) Mercury Contamination Moves Beyond Fish
5) Marine Scientists Report Massive "Dead Zones"
6) Europe Proposes Sharp Reduction In Deep-Sea Fishing To Protect Stocks
7) Seafood Choices Alliance Launches UK Sustainability Program

C) PEW INSTITUTE AND PEW FELLOWS (PF) NEWS

8) Norse receives Nancy Foster Conservation Award
9) KAMADA and Vincent’s Project Seahorse Recognized by Disney Wildlife
Conservation Fund
10) Primavera Convenes Scientists in response to Philippines Oil Spill

D) OPPORTUNITIES AND EVENTS

11) The Florida State University, Coastal and Marine Laboratory:
Associate Director
12) ICES 2006 Conference
13) Society for Conservation Biology- Call for Papers and Nominations
14) Society for Conservation Biology – Policy Coordinator

E) GENERAL INFORMATION AND SUBSCRIPTION INSTRUCTIONS


*SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENT

PEW INSTITUTE FOR OCEAN SCIENCES/UNIVERSITY OF MIAMI SEEKS DIRECTOR FOR
OPERATIONS AND STRATEGIC PROGRAM DEVELOPMENT
LOCATION: NEW YORK (PREFERRED) OR MIAMI, FL
   The Pew Institute for Ocean Science is seeking a Director for
Operations and Strategic Program Development. Duties include: supporting
the Executive Director in the development and implementation of
strategic planning, policy, grant-writing, external outreach, and
operating procedures; assisting the Executive Director in maintaining
and refining the general conceptualization of the Institute; serving as
the first point of contact for program development, communications and
administrative matters relating to the Pew Institute for Ocean Science;
and supervising the Institute’s administrative staff. Preference will be
given to applicants with development and fundraising experience and
experience in non-profit organizations, particularly those focusing on
marine biology or conservation. Requirements: Bachelor’s Degree in
Business Management or an appropriate area of specialization and at
least five years of relevant experience. Must have professional
experience in ocean science and/or ocean conservation and a track record
of increasing responsibility and supervisory capacity, including at
least three years of managerial experience. For the job description, go
to: http://um.hodesiq.com/job_detail.asp?JobID=766666

For more information about the Pew Institute for Ocean Science, go to:
www.pewoceanscience.org or contact Robyn O’Reilly at
ROreilly@rsmas.miami.edu


A) FEATURE

1) U.N. TO CONSIDER DEEP SEA TRAWLING BAN
   Australia, New Zealand and Palau have stated that the United Nations
needs to stop the destruction of deep sea ecosystems by banning
fishermen from trawling nets on the ocean floor. The 192-member United
Nations General Assembly is due to begin debating this week an
Australian-led plan to ban deep sea bottom trawling in unmanaged high
seas and impose tougher regulation of other destructive fishing
practices. The European Commission, executive of the 25-member European
Union, has said it would support a ban on deep sea trawling. U.N.
General Assembly resolutions are non-binding, but they reflect the will
of the international community. About 64 percent of the world’s ocean is
in international waters, of which about three-quarters is unmanaged,
according to the Pew Institute for Ocean Science. "We do know very
little about the deep sea, but what we do know suggests that it is the
largest, most biologically rich place on this earth," Ellen Pikitch,
executive director of the Pew Institute for Ocean Science said. "If the
United Nations does not take action now, I believe we will see a tragic
and unprecedented loss of life before we even have the chance to see it,
to know it, to describe it." As mainstay species like cod and hake
become depleted by overfishing, deepwater species with names such as
forkbeard, orange roughy, black scabbardfish and roundnose grenadier are
an attractive catch as trawlers move to new fishing grounds. A bottom
trawl is a cone-shaped net that is towed by one or two boats across the
sea floor, as much as 1400 meters (4,600 feet) below the surface, its
pointed end retaining all the fish that are scooped up.

Source: Reuters, Michelle Nichols, 3 October 2006
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2006/10/03/AR200610
0300642.html

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B) NEWS AND VIEWS

2) U.S. PRESIDENT BUSH CALLS FOR HALT OF BOTTOM TRAWLING
   President Bush called for a halt to all types of destructive fishing
on the high seas, saying the United States will work to eliminate
practices such as bottom trawling that devastate fish populations and
the ocean floor. Bush’s memo directs the secretaries of the State and
Commerce departments to promote "sustainable" fisheries and to oppose
any fishing practices "that destroy the long-term natural productivity
of fish stocks or habitats such as seamounts, corals, and sponge fields
for short-term gain."  The memo also said the
United States would work
with other nations and international groups to change fishing practices
and create new international fishery regulatory groups if needed. While
Brazil, Chile, Germany, the Netherlands, South Africa and, now, the U.S.
have expressed support for regulating bottom trawling on the high seas,
Spain, Russia and Iceland are among those that oppose it. The
U.S.
allows but regulates bottom trawling in
U.S. waters.
Source: MSNBC News Services, 3 October 2006
http://msnbc.msn.com/id/15117680/

3) POPULAR SOUP IMPERILS SHARKS
   The number of sharks being killed to supply the burgeoning demand for
shark fin soup is three to four times as high as previous estimates,
scientists report in the October issue of Ecology Letters. The study, a
statistical analysis based on records of
Hong Kong shark fin traders,
calculated that 26 million to 73 million sharks are killed each year.
That’s three to four times higher than the numbers reported by the
United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization. Scientists have long
suspected that the UN numbers were too low, thanks to a large chunk of
illegal, unregulated or unreported trade in sharks. But data have been
hard to come by.  "Numbers as high as 100 million had been floating
around for a while, but we had no way of knowing whether or not this was
accurate," says Ellen Pikitch, executive director of the
University of
Miami‘s Pew Institute for Ocean Science and an author on this week’s
paper in Ecology Letters.

Source: Washington Post, Juliet Eilperin, 25 September 2006
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2006/09/24/AR200609
2400753.html?referrer=emailarticle

Also see:
Sharks in hot water, Nature.com, Amanda Leigh Haag, 29 September 2006
http://www.nature.com/news/2006/060925/full/060925-14.html

Citation:
Clarke S. C., McAllister, M. K., Milner-Gulland, E. J., Kirkwood, G. P.,
Michielsens, C. G. J., Agnew, D. J., Pikitch, E. K., Nakano, H.,  and M.
Shivji7 Global estimates of shark catches using trade records from
commercial markets. Ecology Letters, 9. 1115 – 1126 (2006).

Ecology Letters Website:
http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/loi/ELE


4) MERCURY CONTAMINATION MOVES BEYOND FISH
   Once thought of as a problem found only in fish, wildlife experts now
say they’ve found 40 species suffering from mercury contamination.
Mercury contamination is making its way into nearly every habitat in the
United States, not just oceans, according to a report released by the
U.S. National Wildlife Federation. The problem with high mercury levels
in certain types of fish has been well documented, resulting in 46
states issuing advisories for pregnant women and children to avoid
eating certain types of fish, including tuna and swordfish. High levels
of mercury can lead to a wide range of physical ills, including kidney
and neurological damage, and can cause fatigue, vision problems and
tremors. But this is the first report to expose the problem in such a
wide variety of species, 40 to be exact. Scientists found high levels of
mercury in bald eagles, songbirds, polar bears and alligators, to name
just a few species.

Source: ABC News, Laura Marquez, 18 September 2006
http://abcnews.go.com/Technology/story?id=2459581&page=1&CMP=OTC-RSSFeed
s0312

Report available from:
http://www.nwf.org/news/


5) MARINE SCIENTISTS REPORT MASSIVE "DEAD ZONES"
   Rising tides of untreated sewage and plastic debris are seriously
threatening marine life and habitat around the globe, the United Nations
Environment Programme (UNEP) warned in a recently released report. The
number of ocean "dead zones" has grown from 150 in 2004 to about 200
today, said Nick Nuttall, a UNEP spokesperson. Dead zones can encompass
areas of ocean 100,000 square kms in size where little can live because
there is no oxygen left in the water. Nitrogen pollution, mainly from
farm fertilizers and sewage, produces blooms of algae that absorb all of
the oxygen in the water when they decompose. Growing global populations,
mainly concentrated along coastlines, and the resulting increase in
untreated sewage are endangering human health and wildlife, as well as
livelihoods from fisheries to tourism, according to the "State of the
Marine Environment" report.

Source: United National Environmental Programme
http://www.unep.org/Documents.Multilingual/Default.asp?DocumentID=486&Ar
ticleID=5364&l=en

Report available at:
http://www.gpa.unep.org/bin/php/igr/igr2/supporting.php


6) EUROPE PROPOSES SHARP REDUCTION IN DEEP-SEA FISHING
   The European Commission has proposed a tightening of protection for
endangered deep-sea fish stocks in EU waters. "According to scientists,
these stocks are being fished unsustainably," the European Union’s
executive arm said in a statement. "Due to the high risk of collapse of
the deep sea ecosystems, the Commission proposes significant reductions
in Total Allowable Catch (TACs)  for the most threatened stocks". For
the most endangered species, including sharks, black scabbardfish, tusk
and forkbeards, the commission is seeking to cut the total allowable
catches (TACs) for 2007-2008 by a third. Another 33 percent cut is
proposed for the following year. For a number of stocks, last year’s
catches were less than half of the allowed quota, showing that the
current quota system is doing nothing to protect the species.

Source: TerraDaily, 10 October
http://www.terradaily.com/reports/Europe_Proposes_Sharp_Reduction_In_Dee
p_Sea_Fishing_To_Protect_Stocks_999.html

7) Seafood Choices Alliance Launches UK Sustainability Program
   The trade association, the Seafood Choices Alliance, plans to raise
awareness of the issues surrounding sustainability with the launch of
its UK program and the opening of an office in London. With existing
offices in
WashingtonD.C. and Paris, the Alliance is establishing
itself in the
UK to expand the ever-growing marketplace for sustainable
seafood. "The
UK seafood industry is truly embracing the issue of
responsible consumption, but the evolution of interest has created a
diverse group of players, with a wide portfolio of activity," says Mike
Boots, Director of the Seafood Choices Alliance. "The
Alliance has been
very successful in raising awareness about the challenges facing the
oceans and promoting sustainable fish procurement in the
US," comments
Rupert Howes, Chief Executive of the Marine Stewardship Council. "MSC
has been involved in collaborative work with the
Alliance in North
America
from the beginning and is now looks forward to working with them
in the dynamic
UK market place to promote sustainable seafood choices."
The Seafood Choices Alliance has already built a solid track record of
success. For the past several years, the
Alliance has emerged as a major
player at the European Seafood Exposition in
Brussels, convening some of
the world’s largest-volume seafood buyers for a roundtable dialogue on
sustainable procurement.

Source: Fishupdate, 6 October
http://www.fishupdate.com/news/fullstory.php/aid/5505/Seafood_Choices_Al
liance_launches_UK_sustainability_programme.html


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C) PEW INSTITUTE AND PEW FELLOWS (PF) NEWS

8) NORSE RECEIVES 2006 NANCY FOSTER CONSERVATION AWARD
   The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration has named Pew
Fellow Elliott A. Norse as the 2006 recipient of the Nancy Foster Award
for Habitat Conservation. Norse, who is president and chief executive
officer of the Marine Conservation Biology Institute in
Bellevue, Wash.,
received the award this year for his life-long dedication in the private
sector and the federal government to marine ecology and habitat
conservation. Norse’s efforts have benefited the nation and the world.
Dr. Norse was honored for his work in the sciences, his numerous
technical publications and books, and his educational presentations to
diverse audiences. He is known widely as an enthusiastic champion of the
oceans, much like Foster herself.

9) KAMADA AND PROJECT SEAHORSE RECOGNIZED BY DISNEY WILDLIFE
CONSERVATION FUND
   The 2006 Disney Wildlife Conservation Fund (DCWF) Conservation Heroes
program honored Bohol-based KAMADA, an alliance of 800 fisher-families
that Project Seahorse established in 2002 as a part of an initiative to
promote sustainable fishing practices in Danajon Bank in Central
Philippines. This area is one of only six double barrier coral reefs in
the world, located between the islands of
Bohol, Cebu and Leyte. KAMADA
was recognized for its efforts to help conserve local seahorse
populations in Danajon Bank and to assist fishing villages establish
marine sanctuaries for biodiversity conservation and fisheries
regeneration. Of the eight 2006 DCWF Conservation Heroes selected from
hundreds of applications submitted by environmental organizations
working in partnership with communities around the world, KAMADA is the
only winning entry from
Asia. Project Seahorse, under the leadership of
Pew Fellow Amanda Vincent, is an interdisciplinary and international
organization committed to conservation and sustainable use of the
world’s coastal marine ecosystems.

For additional information, go to:
Source: Sun Star Cebu, 8 September 2006
http://www.sunstar.com.ph/static/ceb/2006/09/08/life/disney.honors.fishe
rs.group.html

10) PRIMAVERA CONVENES SCIENTISTS IN RESPONSE TO PHILIPPINES OIL SPILL
   Pew Fellow Jurgenne Primavera convened a group of scientists to
respond to the 11 August 2006 sinking of MT Solar I carrying ~2 million
liters of bunker fuel off Guimaras Strait, which has caused the worst
oil spill in Philippine history and wreaked havoc on both fisherfolk and
marine life in coastal towns and villages in the provinces of Guimaras,
Iloilo and Negros Occidental. In her report, Primavera states: "While
the response from government and other sectors has been unprecedented,
it has also been uncoordinated at times, due to limited availability of
scientific and technical information.  To explain the science of oil
spills, the Philippine Association of Marine Science (PAMS) and the Pew
Fellows Program convened a roundtable discussion on the biophysical and
chemical aspects of oil spills (with focus on the Guimaras event) at the
SEAFDEC Aquaculture Department in Tigbauan,
Iloilo on 15 September 2006.
The objective of the meeting was to build scenarios of the Solar I Oil
Spill to guide ongoing research and coordinate future assessments such
that resources and expertise can be maximized."

For more information on Pew Fellows, visit: www.pewoceanscience.org

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D) OPPORTUNITIES AND EVENTS

11) FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY, COASTAL AND MARINE LABORATORY: ASSOCIATE
DIRECTOR
NORTH FLORIDA, USA
REVIEW OF APPLICATIONS BEGINS 1 NOVEMBER 2006
   The Florida State University Coastal and Marine Laboratory (FSUCML)
invites applications for the position of Associate Director.  The
successful candidate will be responsible for the day-to-day coordination
of education and outreach at the FSUCML.  The Center is seeking a
motivated individual with experience in outreach and policy, the ability
to develop a diverse educational program for FSU students and the
community at large, and the ability to develop and implement mechanisms
for connecting the FSUCML associated faculty and their research to local
communities and to state- and federal-level decision makers.  The intent
is to increase public awareness and understanding of the oceans and of
marine conservation. To apply, please submit electronic copies (PDF
files preferred) of a cover letter, a curriculum vitae, and the names
and e-mail addresses of three references to FSUCML Associate Director
Search, e-mail coleman@bio.fsu.edu
Review of applicants will begin November 1 and will continue until a
successful candidate is identified.

For more information on FSUCML, go to: http://www.marinelab.fsu.edu

12) ICES 2006
30 OCTOBER – 3 NOVEMBER 2006
BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS, USA
   The International Council for the Exploration of the Sea (ICES) is a
worldwide professional affiliation of over 1,600 marine scientists
working collaboratively to fill gaps in marine science. ICES 2006,
Fishing Technology in the 21st Century, is a five-day symposium that
will convene in
Boston, Massachusetts, U.S.A., focusing on the theme of
integrating commercial fishing and ecosystem conservation.

For more information, go to: http://www.ices2006boston.com/

13) 2007 SOCIETY FOR CONSERVATION BIOLOGY ANNUAL MEETING CALL FOR
SYMPOSIA, WORKSHOPS, AND ORGANIZED DISCUSSIONS
DEADLINE – 16 OCTOBER 2006         
   The 21st annual meeting of the Society for Conservation Biology, "One
World, One Conservation, One Partnership," will be held from 1-5 July
2007 in Port Elizabeth, Eastern Cape, South Africa.  The deadline for
proposals for symposia, workshops, and organized discussions is
16
October 2006
.  Sessions will be selected by 8 December 2006. Proposals
for short courses must be submitted by
13 November 2006. These sessions
will be selected by early December 2006. Submit all proposals to
2007@conbio.org as Microsoft Word documents.       

Calls for Nominations – African Section, Australasian Section, and
European Section    
Society for Conservation Biology is currently soliciting nominations for
various positions on each of these Boards of Directors.  The Calls for
each of these sections closes by 25 October 2006
 
For more information about the meeting please visit the website:
http://www.conbio.org/2007/


14) THE SOCIETY FOR CONSERVATION BIOLOGY : POLICY COORDINATOR
DEADLINE: 3 NOVEMBER 2006
WASHINGTON, D.C., USA
The Society for Conservation Biology (SCB) is a global community of
conservation professionals with over 12,000 individuals (resource
managers, educators, government and private conservation workers,
informed members of the public, and students) dedicated advance the
science and practice of conserving the Earth’s biological diversity.
The SCB seeks a Policy Coordinator (PC) to fill two critical roles: to
participate directly in the policy process and to empower the membership
by providing them with the information and skills necessary to influence
the process themselves. Generally the PC is responsible for coordinating
all policy activities of the Society and is expected to maintain an
office in the Executive Office of SCB in
Arlington, Virginia. This
position requires significant abilities and experience in
communications, a broad understanding of SCB’s mission and philosophies,
sensitivity to maintaining an objective role for SCB scientists in the
policy arena, and a clear vision for SCB’s role in influencing
conservation policy and compelling ideas on how to achieve it.

Applicants should send cover letter (including statement of interest)
and resume to:
Alan D. Thornhill, PhD., Executive Director, Society for Conservation
Biology
athornhill@conbio.org

More information about SCB can be found at: http://www.conbio.org

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E) GENERAL INFORMATION AND SUBSCRIPTION INSTRUCTIONS

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2017-01-17T09:22:32+00:00October 12th, 2006|News|Comments Off on SeaSpan Newsletter